• The Legends Tour

Inkster chips in with short game tip


Short game, short game, short game. There’s a reason LPGA professionals say it three times when talking about the key to scoring. It’s kinda like location, location, location in real estate. Your short game is as critical to shooting a great score as location is to scoring a valuable property. In fact, it’s well-documented that short game accounts for just under 70% of a player’s shots in a typical round of golf.

Essentially, if you can chip well, you can save a lot of strokes. Chipping can be intimidating because it involves a small swing, a little bit of airtime and mostly roll, and your ball is usually in thicker grass just off the green. It’s one of the shortest shots in golf, but often more challenging than taking a full swing.

Take it from LPGA and World Golf Hall of Famer Juli Inkster, having a solid chip shot in your bag can help you get it closer to the hole when it matters most, and you’ll be amazed at how having confidence in one stroke can help you in all aspects of your golf game.

“The key to chipping is to have soft hands and to feel a slight movement in your feet,” says Inkster, a 31-time LPGA Tour winner with seven major championship titles. “Don’t stand flat-footed.”


Inkster’s chip shot pointers:

  • Use a 52 degree wedge and choke down on it

  • Position ball in back of narrow stance, hands forward

  • Use your body, not your wrists – this is not a “wrist-y shot”

  • Move your body back and through with a balanced stance

  • Focus on good tempo, rhythm – it’s not a “fast” motion or quick move

Need a visual? Watch Juli Inkster’s Chip and Run Video Now >>

Bottom Line: Carving out more practice time for your short game will translate into a better performance on the golf course. If you find chipping “boring,” try chipping with one ball in your next practice session. Chip the ball, putt it, return to position, chip the ball, putt it, and so forth. Make a game of it and see how many times out of 10 you can get it “up and down,” which means to make the putt after you chip up. Who knows, maybe you’ll even chip one in!



Shared from Fore! Fridays, a weekly e-pub of stories and conversation starters designed to help you look good, play better and know more when it comes to golf.